“It looks beautiful”

The first thought that came to my mind when I woke the computer from its sleep state was just one thought. It looks beautiful

I never understood why some people are attracted to research, especially when dealing with molecules such as proteins and DNA that cannot be visualized by the naked eye. It looks like a bunch of liquid, really, as you are going through the various steps of purification. Not to mention, in order to get to this ‘liquid’ phase, you need to go through growing bacteria and harvesting them and getting them — the bacteria, that is — to over express your protein.

And if it doesn’t work, you need to start from step one.

There is a lot of modification that happens in lab. Tweak the concentration of compound A. Add a little more of compound B. Let it incubate longer. Did you wake up your bacteria from the -4C freezer?

Not to mention, you never really know what the proteins are doing in this ‘liquid’ as you are working with it.

But despite all these challenges and the set backs that I have faced in lab, I am still amazed at the way various biochemistry techniques, such as SEC (size exclusion chromatography) can yield such clear, definitive results. If the protein is there, it will elute at the fraction corresponding roughly to its molecular weight. If it isn’t there, or if the protein decided it wants to aggregate and clump together, then the chromatogram will show just that.

There is such a satisfaction with seeing a pure peak, a clear, indicative peak that gives insight into what the protein in this ‘liquid’ might just be doing.

Its trivial, I know. I never understood it, from the outside looking in, reading journal publications on how researchers have this moment of “ah-hah”, how they see beauty in results. Now I get it. I have seen it from the other side. It truly is beautiful when you see the results you hope for, knowing that something you have done is right.

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